Summit Goal: Highest Points to Hike in These 10 Asian Countries

The journey might be hard but the summit view makes it worth it

You don’t have to go far because nestled between the city of Davao and the province of Davao del Sur is Philippines’ tallest mountain. In 1936, President Manuel L. Quezon declared the mountain as a national park to save the mountain’s flora and fauna and preserve the more than 200 species of birds in the area, including the rare Philippine eagle. Hiking the mountain exposes trekkers to forests, crags, rivers, mossy swaps, and lakes, but after all the sweat, the summit will reward you with a stunning view.

 

MALAYSIA: Mount Kinabalu, 13,435 feet

Mount Kinabalu, the highest mountain between the Himalayas and New Guinea, is one of the world’s most important biological sites with its over 6,000 plant species. The mountain is also located at a renowned World Heritage Site – Kinabalu Park.

In order to climb Mount Kinabalu, hikers have to apply for a hiking permit that will allow them a 2D1N trek up the mountain. Check out Mount Kinabalu’s official website for details on how to get the permit and for useful guides, latest news, and updates on the mountain.

 

JAPAN: Mount Fuji 12,390 feet